family

Husbandly Drunkenness

This post is about husbandly drunkenness.

But before we get to the booze, the arguing, the complaining about small portions, and the snoring, we have to get to the more snore-worthy matter of privacy.

Oh my God!

I’ve had a 100 emails about this, and this post might be your 101st.

Broadly, there is an ‘Unsubscribe’ button at the end of each email. It does what it says on the tin: goes to MailChimp which will then automagically unsubscribe you.

And it happens without my having to do anything (easy-peasy!).

Please, to unsubscribe from the emails, click ‘Unsubscribe’. 

And if you don’t, then you haven’t, and MailChimp won’t.

The End.

So, the husband is complaining about a shortage of husbandly drunkenness. “A grave deficit”, he says, emphasising the middle word in a thirsty gravel.

Is this justified?

Does your husband complain about such an undersupply? And men, do you complain to your wives (and in a few cases, husbands) about the global husbandly-drunkenness shortfall?

What should the UN do about it? 

(’Cause sure as biscuits, Donald Trump isn’t going to help.)

See you at your next adjustment!

— Dr MaryAnne

The attitude of a 12-year-old

In the parenting world, I'm in what you could call the 'Sweet Spot'.

No nappies.

No more breastfeeding.

No more naps.

They can feed themselves.

They're all in school.

The Sweet Spot.

But, it's not gonna last for long.

My eldest is 12.

And there are more and more moments that reveal themselves to tell me that I'm slowly (not slow enough) coming out of that Sweet Spot.

Teenage attitude has peaked its head out.

And it hits you like, "WHAT WAS THAT?"

And then you go into this denial.

"Oh no no no," you're thinking.

That wasn't really attitude. That was an 'accident'.

But then it happens again.

And again.

Three months of this attitude that pops up more and more makes you, 

FORCES YOU

to get a grip and realise that the hormones have taken control.

Am I doomed?

Am I no longer in that Sweet Spot?

Those hormones are just crazy.

Not only does my daughter talk smack,

she knows how to negotiate, argue a good point, challenge my logic, and persist until I say yes.

I admit, she's good.

(She didn't get those skills from me. My husband's the negotiator. Among other things.)

The other thing about hormones is that I've noticed how much her body is changing.

Mostly for the good, but sometimes it's not fun for her.

And I can blame some of it from all the screen/mobile/device usage:

She's been complaining about spinal pain and headaches more frequently.

Before these changes started, I can't even remember her complaining about those things before.

And since her body has entered into that inevitable phase of puberty, she's come to me saying,

"Mom, can you give me an adjustment. My head is hurting a little."

And this week over half-term, she's had a different schedule, doing different things and activities including a lot of travel, and she's been complaining about feeling discomfort in her back.

And tonight I gave her her 3rd adjustment.

Each time she has laid down on the adjusting bench, I've noticed how her body is going through a big growth spurt.

There's so much development going on.

And I can see some things that are new and different too.

So, like I do for everyone else I adjust, I ask things.

This week I asked my daughter, "Are you excited or nervous about going back to school next week?"

Predictably, she answered, "What? Uhhhh, nope. Um I don't know."

She didn't know.

She's not aware enough.

Also, she's a little stubborn about sharing her feelings or insecurities with me.

But that's another issue I'm working on.

Teenagers go through incredible changes, and it's very important to help support their bodies go through them as best as possible.

The wonderful thing about my daughter's changes is that she's aware enough to know that she needs an adjustment.

There are some weeks where I don't adjust her at all.

And then like this past week, she gets three.

Sometimes our children need those boosts.

We as parents, especially as mums, know when our babies are not at 100%.

It's like the light in their eyes is dimmed.

Or they smell different.

Or, they sound differently when they talk to us.

We know.

That's when they need an adjustment the most.

Keeping their nervous systems and bodies in alignment and balance is so helpful in allowing them grow into their fullest potential.

To help them continually be their best.

So, if you sense that your child is going through a growth spurt, or some big change, or for any reason, bring them in for an adjustment.

One adjustment for a child goes a looong way.

See you at your next adjustment!

— Dr MaryAnne

 

She thought she was cheating on me

I’m having an affair!

One of my long-term lovely wonderful practice members said that to me recently.

"I didn't know what to say to you. I feel like I'm having an affair. I'm cheating on you!"

She was in with her 6-week-old baby for their weekly adjustment.

"Oh, I feel so bad!"

Yup. She was serious.

I could tell that she genuinely felt bad.

"I'm taking her to the osteopath next week."

OMG.

WHAT?

That's what she feels bad about?

"Oh don't be silly," is what I said back to her.

I can understand her feelings because she's been coming to see me for her adjustments way back when she was pregnant with her first child.

With all my long-term practice members, it's an honour and a joy to adjust people for such an extended period of time.

That's the practice I've built.

Family Wellness.

For life.

That's what it's all about.

And I also know that there are many other experts that are excellent and able to help many people as well.

Including osteopaths.

Most of the osteopaths I've met are great.

They see many babies as well and they do similar things that I do.

That's because the practices are quite similar.

It's important to do what you think and feel is best for yourself and your children.

Who I am is just another expert who will always serve you and give the best care, advice, and support possible.

People ask me questions all the time, and I will always asses the situation and give my best most knowledgable advice possible.

If I don't know the answer, then I'll say, "I don't know."

My practice member wasn't cheating on me. 

No affair happening here.

Plus, she was being honest! 

That's not having an affair.

She didn't even go to the other expert yet, so no affair even happened!

The bottom line is, if chiropractic care helps your life and health, and you choose me, then I'll always be available to help and serve you with the best of my abilities.

My passion and mission is to help as many babies, children, and families to live their most healthy and extraordinary lives.

I believe that chiropractic care is a huge component of achieving that.

Osteopathy, massage, physiotherapy, acupuncture, or other body healing modalities all play a part in helping achieve health, too.

It's how and what you find to help your body heal itself, where it's designed to reorganise to higher levels of health.

Chiropractic will always be a part of my life for me, for my health as well as my family's.

I definitely need other expert help to keep me energised and fully functional.

And I also have a much-loved one that brings me a whole lotta pleasure 3-4 times a week:

Red wine!

Cheers!

See you at your next adjustment!

— Dr MaryAnne

 

The Perks of Being Married to a Brit

It's been a busy few months in my home and my home practice.

The change created a settling period and I also went away to attend a few seminars.

Life's been busy!

One of the seminars was in Washington DC for a huge pediatric and family chiropractic wellness seminar, hosted by the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association, of which I am an active member.

And because I was all the way over the pond, I of course had to make a stop into New York City, my hometown, on my way back to London.

My close friend insisted she take me out to dinner since we only had 24 hours together.

So we wanted to make the best of it.

We went all the way downtown in SoHo to this fantastic restaurant, with a fantastic wine list. 

I had purposefully not eaten lunch because I really wanted to indulge and eat tons of food at this place, as well as letting myself share a bottle of red wine with my good friend.

The food was incredibly delicious (I had this amazing scallop dish with squid and sea urchin risotto!).

My friend had a juicy fillet of steak (for which they are famously known).

The conversation was rolling, as was the time and of course, the wine. 

Pretty quickly, we downed the whole bottle of wine.

We couldn't muster up ordering another one, so we just said, "We'll just have another glass of red please."

Right.

Can you guess what happened?

We ordered a few more glasses between each other, and I could tell we passed a certain point of no return.

At least my friend did.

Interestingly, I was feeling great. 

Not too inebriated.

Just right.

However, I could tell that my friend was getting a little bit loud.

We stayed enjoying our meal and wine until the place was nearly empty and the staff was even heading home.

It was time to hail a cab.

I was still feeling fine, but my friend wasn't even able to walk straight towards the taxi.

We get in, and I immediately see her open the window and stick her head out.

Sick.

All the way back uptown.

On one hand, I was grateful that I didn't feel sick like her.

Then, on the other hand, I thought, "Is this what living in the UK with a British husband does?"

Serious Liver Training.

AKA Very Slow Alcohol Titration Training.

I texted my husband at 2:30am New York time to tell him that there might be schools closing because of a water main pipe bursting and some people had no water in Streatham.

His reply, "What the hell are you doing up?"

"We just got home."

"[surprise emoticon]"

"And you would be 'proud' of me. Your wife-married-to-a-Brit didn't get sick like her American friend wife-married-to-an-American."

Yes people. It's the little things in life that make it all fun and interesting.

And marriage interesting as well.

Bottom line is, I wasn't proud.

In fact, I got back to London and things got busier and busier in the practice.

And then after a few weeks, I realised that it had been nearly a month since I last got adjusted.

(Cue in the Shock Horror music)

I know. Crazy, right?

And guess what, I have had to do some serious catching up to get my system back online, back into high energy-richness, and feeling great.

That's what happens when I neglect what's the most important to me.

(And too much wine drinking.)

My health.

The way I keep myself strong and energised is from my regular adjustments.

I let myself go.

And it was a huge wake-up call.

This past week since Easter I've been adjusted twice already, and I've got my adjustments lined up for myself next week too.

When's the last time you got adjusted?

Do you feel the difference if you miss your adjustment?

Being married to a Brit definitely has its perks, but he's not going to adjust my spine and make my life perfect. 

That's my job.

I'm responsible for that.

So, come on over to my home practice where it's super cozy and really great.

And you get an awesome adjustment!

See you soon!

— Dr MaryAnne


 

I'm moving!

Don't worry!

I'm only relocating 5 minutes away.

It's time to make a change.

Last week I announced that I was going to share some news.

Now I'm ready to tell you all!

It took me a few months to simmer with the idea, and once I made the decision, I knew it was the right thing to do.

I'm moving my practice back into my house.

In Streatham Hill.

Overall, this move is better for me.

The main reason is because I'm a mum.

And children don't stay little very long.

Time flies.

And my priority in life - the most important thing to me - is my family.

So, moving my practice back into my house is the best thing for me now so I can juggle my family life, and my practice life.

Ultimately, I know it's what will allow me to serve you better.

So, my new address for my practice is:

2 Wavertree Rd, SW2 3SW

My first day adjusting at the new address, my house, will be on Tuesday 30th January.

So, in two weeks when you come to your adjustment don't come to 44 Lancaster!

I'll be sending out texts to people to make sure there's no mistake. 

I wouldn't want you to come to Lancaster and I'm not there! 

That would stress you and me out.

I don't want that to happen.

Parking is not as easy since it's just near the Streatham Hill high street. 

But, if there isn't a car in front of my driveway, feel free to park right in front. No problem!

If you have any questions, please hit reply and let me know!

I'm looking forward to seeing all of you at my new practice location!

In the meantime, see you later on this week for your next adjustment.

— Dr MaryAnne
 

Moms and CEOs

Generally, moms in the household run the show.

The other day during one of my training sessions with my training group, we were discussing how it's the moms who run the household.

(We're all women in the group.)

There were certain theories about that.

No one could point to the real reason why.

Or, we just all couldn't agree on the best answer.

My theory is based on the different brains that men and women have.

(Or if one person's brain is more female than male.)

It's all about the neurology of the person.

It's well known that women's brains use more synapses that cross the hemispheres.

When men use their brains, there are fewer synapses crossing the hemispheres, and more synapses in just one side.

Which leads me to my theory about women doing more jobs.

We have what is called 'diffuse awareness'. 

Men are single-focused.

Jobs and activities at home on the domestic front are often chaotic, and there's a plethora of things to do and to get done.

Kids are running around everywhere.

Laundry needs to get done.

The cat needs to be fed.

Dinner needs to be prepared (what the hell do I cook for dinner tonight).

And the list goes on and on.

Women are generally better are assessing and tackling these jobs at the same time.

Men need to do one thing at a time.

Of course, I'm generalising, but ask any woman and most of the time, she'll explain that she's the one who manages the household.

I don't even bother telling my husband what's happening until the morning of.

And when the kids are on a school break, I tell him, 

"Oh, by the way honey, it's half-term."

He looks at me with big open eyes like it's fresh news to him and he had no idea, let alone was it even on his radar of need-to-know-knowledge,

"Oh? Is it? Ok. What are you doing with them?"

(sigh)

Anyway, are moms the CEOs?

Well, however it is in your household, here's something you can listen to when you're next taking out the trash or doing the dishes.

It's my newest podcast episode.

My guest and I talk about how mothers are leaders, just like the CEOs of the world.

It's a great episode, very illuminating!

Listen on iTunes or on my "You're Doing Great Mom" website.

Be sure to subscribe and write a review! I'd be very grateful!

Thanks!

— Dr MaryAnne

 

The most important thing they miss

I had my first child in a birthing centre which was located on the 11th floor of the hospital on the Upper West Side in New York City.

I chose it because it was a great birthing centre, and it happened to be only twenty blocks away from our flat.

Convenience and practicality are pretty high on the list of a labouring woman.

I had a midwife, a doula, and my husband helping me through the labour.

And after 3 hours of active labour (making it a total of 23 hours from the very first contraction I felt), my little baby girl was born at 3:00 in the morning.

I remember how insanely overwhelming the whole experience was. 

Giving birth, pushing a 4kg baby out of me in the middle of the night, being up moving around labouring all day, feeling intense pain, thinking how my Ironman was easier than this ... then not to mention how do I do this mommy thing ... 

It's all a lot to process.

Don't ya think?

After everything settled (and I had a huge breakfast with coffee and pancakes and eggs that amounted to probably 10,000 calories), I was ready to bring my baby home.

But, I was told, the pediatrician has to sign you off.

What does that mean, I ask?

I had no idea how these things worked.

(It was my first baby.)

The nurse explained to me that the doctor had to look my baby over to make sure everything was healthy.

Ok.

Fair enough.

That's important.

I could already tell she was fine.

But it's important to make sure everything really is doing fine.

So, the doctor finally arrived and did her thing.

With stethoscope in hand, she poked and prodded.

Heart: check.

Lungs: check.

Hips: check.

Reflexes: check.

Strength: check.

Spine?

Skull?

Alignment?

Nope. 

Nada.

Zilch.

The doc didn't check those last three things.

I thought, "Doesn't matter, I'll check her. Just let me go home."

It wasn't until years later that it dawned on me that pediatric medical doctors don't do what I would do.

To be fair, they have their specific skills, and it's essential for them to do their job.

I'm grateful for that.

What's missing is the newborn's spinal check.

That's one of the most important bits!

All newborns need to get checked after they are born.

It needs to be a standard normal procedure done by a skilled trained paediatric chiropractor. 

Or even an osteopath.

The point is, so many babies are born every day, every where, and it's usually not until the mother thinks something 'is wrong' with her baby that she takes them to see a chiropractor.

That just doesn't make any sense to me.

Why, at the hospital within 24 hours of birth, does the doctor have everything checked except for the integrity of the nervous system and spine?

Babies also undergo hearing tests too. 

But where's the assessment for the baby's spine?

Please, can someone explain that to me?

In any case, if you have a baby, or children, and they haven't had their spines checked, go NOW.

Take them to a chiropractor and have their spines assessed and adjusted.

Because it's MUCH easier to keep children healthy than to deal with grumpy difficult contorted adults.

See you at your next adjustment!

— Dr MaryAnne