teenager

The attitude of a 12-year-old

In the parenting world, I'm in what you could call the 'Sweet Spot'.

No nappies.

No more breastfeeding.

No more naps.

They can feed themselves.

They're all in school.

The Sweet Spot.

But, it's not gonna last for long.

My eldest is 12.

And there are more and more moments that reveal themselves to tell me that I'm slowly (not slow enough) coming out of that Sweet Spot.

Teenage attitude has peaked its head out.

And it hits you like, "WHAT WAS THAT?"

And then you go into this denial.

"Oh no no no," you're thinking.

That wasn't really attitude. That was an 'accident'.

But then it happens again.

And again.

Three months of this attitude that pops up more and more makes you, 

FORCES YOU

to get a grip and realise that the hormones have taken control.

Am I doomed?

Am I no longer in that Sweet Spot?

Those hormones are just crazy.

Not only does my daughter talk smack,

she knows how to negotiate, argue a good point, challenge my logic, and persist until I say yes.

I admit, she's good.

(She didn't get those skills from me. My husband's the negotiator. Among other things.)

The other thing about hormones is that I've noticed how much her body is changing.

Mostly for the good, but sometimes it's not fun for her.

And I can blame some of it from all the screen/mobile/device usage:

She's been complaining about spinal pain and headaches more frequently.

Before these changes started, I can't even remember her complaining about those things before.

And since her body has entered into that inevitable phase of puberty, she's come to me saying,

"Mom, can you give me an adjustment. My head is hurting a little."

And this week over half-term, she's had a different schedule, doing different things and activities including a lot of travel, and she's been complaining about feeling discomfort in her back.

And tonight I gave her her 3rd adjustment.

Each time she has laid down on the adjusting bench, I've noticed how her body is going through a big growth spurt.

There's so much development going on.

And I can see some things that are new and different too.

So, like I do for everyone else I adjust, I ask things.

This week I asked my daughter, "Are you excited or nervous about going back to school next week?"

Predictably, she answered, "What? Uhhhh, nope. Um I don't know."

She didn't know.

She's not aware enough.

Also, she's a little stubborn about sharing her feelings or insecurities with me.

But that's another issue I'm working on.

Teenagers go through incredible changes, and it's very important to help support their bodies go through them as best as possible.

The wonderful thing about my daughter's changes is that she's aware enough to know that she needs an adjustment.

There are some weeks where I don't adjust her at all.

And then like this past week, she gets three.

Sometimes our children need those boosts.

We as parents, especially as mums, know when our babies are not at 100%.

It's like the light in their eyes is dimmed.

Or they smell different.

Or, they sound differently when they talk to us.

We know.

That's when they need an adjustment the most.

Keeping their nervous systems and bodies in alignment and balance is so helpful in allowing them grow into their fullest potential.

To help them continually be their best.

So, if you sense that your child is going through a growth spurt, or some big change, or for any reason, bring them in for an adjustment.

One adjustment for a child goes a looong way.

See you at your next adjustment!

— Dr MaryAnne

 

Butt-shuffling, W-Sitting, and Moody Teenagers

Last time I was in New York, I went to a kid gymnastic class with my friend and her daughter. 

There were a bunch of mums there hanging out, waiting in the mummy-hang-out-area where lots of mums sit and chat during the class.

There were also lots of babies there.

One of the babies was bum-shuffling to move around.

So I asked the mother if she's been doing that for a while.

"For about a month."

Then I asked her if she crawls at all.

"No."

(I had a suspicion that she never crawled and she only shuffles.)

So I explained to her that it would be good it she took her to a paediatric chiropractor to assess her spine and pelvis to see if anything is causing that.

Crawling is probably one of the most important developmental milestones.

The action helps create the proper development of the brain and it's direct connection with all the muscles in the body.

The left side of the brain needs to be able to properly communicate with the right side of the brain. 

And the crawling action makes those connections happen with each stride.

Right arm, left leg.

Left arm, right leg.

As your baby develops, many movements and reflexes function to help the brain cross-communicate.

This leads to optimal brain function.

As the child grows, the muscles need to grow and contract properly in order for them to walk properly, become more coordinated, as well as other actions such as speech development, learning, eye sight, and behaviour.

If a baby doesn't crawl, it's indicative of something not ideally developing in the brain and body, and leads to a cascade of other developmental issues.

The next thing that a child might do which is commonly correlated to bum-shuffling is W-Sitting.

W-Sitting is a sign that the 'tone' of the body is hypermobile, or hypomobile.

The younger a child start W-Sitting, the more significant of a problem it can be.

When I explained all this to the mother in NY, another mum piped in and rudely said, "Oh, this stuff doesn't mean anything. How do you know all this?"

I was shocked at how NY-bitchy she was.

She started debating with me!

So I just asked her, "How do you know your child has a healthy spine?"

She just stared at me, like, "Uuuuhhhhhh?"

Then I said, "How do you know if there's a problem in your child's nervous system?"

Again, "Uuuuhhhhhh?"

Then I stopped and decided that I was wasting my breath with her. 

You can bring the horse to the water, but you can't make it drink.

Anyway, let's fast forward through a baby girl's life to age 14.

Often, when I see a teenager with painful periods, horrible headaches, moody PMT month after month, I find out that this girl had signs of improper developmental milestones as a baby.

Bum-shuffling, W-Sitting, late walking.

This can indicate poor spinal development, which can cause a dysfunction in the whole system, affecting other parts of the body's systems.

The hormonal (endocrine) system.

The reproductive system.

The immune system.

The digestive system.

All of it.

This is why it's so important to have all babies checked when they are newborns. 

This will give them more opportunity and likelihood to have proper development of the spine, brain, and nervous system.

So, if your baby isn't crawling, or they aren't properly crawling, bring them in and let me check their spines!

They grow up to be healthy happy kids!

Who wants a severely moody teenager anyway?

See you at your next adjustment!

— Dr MaryAnne

 

My kids speaks this strange alien language that I don't understand

As someone who was raised in America, I've always been amazed at how easy it is to travel to a completely different country within a couple hours from London.

Plane or train.

Doesn't matter.

It's very cool.

A two-hour train ride in America, and you're still in the same State (most of the time). 

I can't believe more Londoners don't take advantage of living so close to Paris!

It's so great to be able to hop on a fast train, and then BAM, you're in frogland.

Oui! Oui!

C'est magnifique!

Anyway, on the very crowded train, I met this very sweet young mother with her toddler daughter.

I couldn't help but offer my assistance because there was a jumble of seats with a big family of overgrown loud teenagers, and I could tell that this mother just wanted a comfortable seat with her little girl.

So I managed to talk the other people into rearranging their seating plan, and the young mother was able to sit next with us in the quattro seating (with the table in the middle).

Much better outcome.

She was very grateful.

It was simple to do. 

Little effort.

Big payout.

Stressless journey with children.

(Is that really possible?)

We had a lovely ride into Paris.

My kids played with the little girl, and everyone was happy.

I was probably the happiest because my eldest kept on talking in the strangest accent. I think she picked it up on YouTube. She contorts her face and has this annoying rhythm, tone, and intonation. 

Very strange.

So I basically ignored her. I had to. Instead, I focused on having a nice conversation with the young mother sitting next to me.

She asked me if I work and what I do.

Sure enough she became very interested when I told her that my special interest is with babies' and children's spinal health.

Most people have no clue what chiropractic paediatrics is.

"What does it mean for a child to go have a chiropractic check-up?"

I explained to her how important it is for all newborns to have their spines check shortly after birth.

Doesn't a paediatrician check the baby's heart, breathing, ears, genitals, etc?

How about one of the most important organs in the body?

The brain and the spine - the central nervous system?

This mother was totally fascinated.

"Yes, that makes sense!"

She even explained to me that her baby was born with forceps because she was twisted in a strange position stuck in the birth canal.

(Do you know how often I hear mothers say this?)

Listen, I love what I do. And if I can speak to one mother a day to show them how important it is to have her child's spine checked, then I feel that I've helped make a positive change in that child's (and mother's) life.

Because a healthy child is what we all want.

Healthy children lead to a happier world for the future.

Do you get it?

Good.

Now, I'm off to go eat some delicious French food.

Au revoir et a bientot!

See you next week for your adjustment!

(Don't forget to book in your £25 massage! Only ten days left at this price.)

— Dr MaryAnne