fun

Sometimes you just gotta boogie down, baby

Yesterday's email was all good and heartfelt.

Actually, I felt a little vulnerable there, to be totally honest with you.

A lot of my friends commented on my blog post about being broody by saying,

"Go for it. Have another baby!"

No way.

Anyway, that wasn't the point of the message.

I want to put more energy into my family.

My fun and crazy kids.

My husband.

And all the stress, joy, chaos, and spontaneity about it all!

Time to embrace it more!

I know that in about 30 years I'll be exhaling in joy, so proud and happy that I took this time to be fully present with my brood.

I know it'll all be worth it.

When I first became a mother 11.5 years ago, I had a really hard time going through the change from being such a career-driven woman, in New York City, always thinking about me, me, me, into being a new mother and experiencing such a new reality with a tiny human being.

It was hard.

And really uncomfortable.

I didn't like it.

But I knew in my heart this is what I wanted to do.

Now, I'm overwhelmed with the same drive, the same motivation to make some changes.

Change.

Some very physical and concrete: a huge house renovation, which will require us to move out temporarily so the builders can get in there and get it done.

We'll be living in a small flat during this time.

The five of us.

What could go wrong?

Five very big and loud people who like to demand space and their presence to be known.

I find myself stepping into a familiar feeling of discomfort.

I'm really uncomfortable.

And I'm not liking it.

Thoughts of doubt are creeping in. 

Thinking of the unknown.

How am I going to get through this?

The feeling of instability is very scary.

It's like a huge stretch and I don't think I can bend anymore.

Still, I'm standing my ground, remembering my purpose, my love for my kids, and how this time will bring me to a new place of freedom and joy in my life because I know it's what I want.

And that's the key. 

I WANT so many things in life, and sometimes to get there, to be that person, well, it takes a little instability and stretching along the way.

So I stick to what I know works best for me.

Eating well.

Sleeping well.

Exercising regularly.

Getting adjusted every week.

Creating my structure and sticking to it.

Choosing to do things that make me happy, and not feel guilty about it.

And, for me, it also doesn't hurt to have a nice glass of red wine every now and then.

Today, I've spent a big chunk of time doing things for my practice (like writing this to you guys).

Admin.

Organising notes.

And in between my thoughts I've been pausing to blast some good tunes, get up, and dance for 10 minutes just to get the blood to flow.

It feels good.

Gotta keep following my heart and passion. Stay on the path!

See you soon at your next adjustment!

Stay on YOUR path!

— Dr MaryAnne




 

It's called the whip nae nae, mom.

Spending time with my girls in Paris has been a chock full o' fun.

(And lots of learning about the latest trendy stuff. My daughters talk even more than I do.)

My 11-year-old is practically a teenager and she's teaching me a lot of songs, dance moves, and new ways to speak.

Frankly, I don't remember being like this when I was eleven.

(I probably was though.)

Kids these days seem to grow up much faster than when I was a kid.

(Is it technology that accelerates it the maturity process?)

Anyway, since we used to live in Paris, I still have a few friends living here so we went to have lunch with a close dear friend of mine.

She's a little bit younger than me, and my daughter really loves her too.

I hadn't seen her for a couple years, so it was great to see her.

The last time I saw her, things were a little sketchy in her life, and she was not doing very well causing her to resort to anti-depressant drugs.

When she told me this at the time, I did whatever I could to help her remotely, chatting with her online, texting, and emailing. 

I always told her that I knew she had it in her to fight this tough time in her life without using the drugs. I was confident that she didn't need them.

Unfortunately, so many women (1 in 7 women in the US) are taking anti-depressants and anti-anxiety drugs for their emotional states of depression.

And these women have no idea that almost all cases can be remedied and healed 100% naturally.

Take a look at this awesome interview with Marie Forleo and Dr Kelly Brogan.

Dr Kelly is a board-certified psychiatrist, who specialises in women's health, specifically depression and anxiety.

She just released this book all about healing depression naturally through exercise, diet, mindfulness, and meditation.

It's a phenomenal book.

I love it.

She's a big supporter and advocate for chiropractic care as well. 

I highly recommend learning more about what she teaches, how diet, foods, exercise and meditation can help clear and heal so many diseases, including depression.

As for my friend, over lunch with her, she was glowing with happiness, and she was so proud to tell me that she was doing fantastically well and she was able to get off the anti-depressants and heal herself naturally. 

Awesome. 

It is absolutely possible to make this happen. I know this and I'll always stand by that truth!

Healing naturally is how you will be healthy. Not the drugs.

Check out Dr Kelly Brogan's website to see what she's saying about it.

In the meantime, make sure you book your massage at this amazing price of £25 for one hour!

Remember, you can book the massage now for a date later on in the future.

You pay now, and have the massage in a few weeks if that makes it easier for you!

See you next week!

Have a wonderful Easter weekend.

— Dr MaryAnne

My kids speaks this strange alien language that I don't understand

As someone who was raised in America, I've always been amazed at how easy it is to travel to a completely different country within a couple hours from London.

Plane or train.

Doesn't matter.

It's very cool.

A two-hour train ride in America, and you're still in the same State (most of the time). 

I can't believe more Londoners don't take advantage of living so close to Paris!

It's so great to be able to hop on a fast train, and then BAM, you're in frogland.

Oui! Oui!

C'est magnifique!

Anyway, on the very crowded train, I met this very sweet young mother with her toddler daughter.

I couldn't help but offer my assistance because there was a jumble of seats with a big family of overgrown loud teenagers, and I could tell that this mother just wanted a comfortable seat with her little girl.

So I managed to talk the other people into rearranging their seating plan, and the young mother was able to sit next with us in the quattro seating (with the table in the middle).

Much better outcome.

She was very grateful.

It was simple to do. 

Little effort.

Big payout.

Stressless journey with children.

(Is that really possible?)

We had a lovely ride into Paris.

My kids played with the little girl, and everyone was happy.

I was probably the happiest because my eldest kept on talking in the strangest accent. I think she picked it up on YouTube. She contorts her face and has this annoying rhythm, tone, and intonation. 

Very strange.

So I basically ignored her. I had to. Instead, I focused on having a nice conversation with the young mother sitting next to me.

She asked me if I work and what I do.

Sure enough she became very interested when I told her that my special interest is with babies' and children's spinal health.

Most people have no clue what chiropractic paediatrics is.

"What does it mean for a child to go have a chiropractic check-up?"

I explained to her how important it is for all newborns to have their spines check shortly after birth.

Doesn't a paediatrician check the baby's heart, breathing, ears, genitals, etc?

How about one of the most important organs in the body?

The brain and the spine - the central nervous system?

This mother was totally fascinated.

"Yes, that makes sense!"

She even explained to me that her baby was born with forceps because she was twisted in a strange position stuck in the birth canal.

(Do you know how often I hear mothers say this?)

Listen, I love what I do. And if I can speak to one mother a day to show them how important it is to have her child's spine checked, then I feel that I've helped make a positive change in that child's (and mother's) life.

Because a healthy child is what we all want.

Healthy children lead to a happier world for the future.

Do you get it?

Good.

Now, I'm off to go eat some delicious French food.

Au revoir et a bientot!

See you next week for your adjustment!

(Don't forget to book in your £25 massage! Only ten days left at this price.)

— Dr MaryAnne

You've won the lottery

A few weekends ago, my son and I went to Paris.

My sister needed help.

So I went.

My sister didn't want my whole zoo-clan packed in her space, so I had to choose one of my monkeys.

Eenie-meenie miney-mo.

I chose my son because it was his turn for some 'mummy-and-me' time.

We were in one of my go-to shops in Paris to stock up on some cool French stuff and Max started to whine about something. 

(I don't even remember what it was about.)

I just stopped cold in my tracks.

"Really Max? You're complaining? Really?"

Oh no. I wasn't havin' it.

Right there in the shop I just gave him this life lesson.

Nip that shitz in the bud.

There is no complaining when in Paris.

There is no crying in baseball.

And there is no complaining in Paris.

(Yeah right - try telling that to all the other French living there.)

Especially not after you've eaten a fresh pain au chocolat. And you're in a cool Parisian shop. With your mum. On a mummy/son trip. Together. Without your sisters.

Oh hell no.

There is NO complaining allowed.

Then I started to remind him about what he's grateful for.

We made a list.

"Max, gimme 5 things you're grateful for."

When my kids start complaining about the stupidest stuff, I just stop them right there and say, "No. You do NOT get to complain right now."

One of my favourite dudes to watch, listen, follow and learn from is Gary Vaynerchuk

Love him.

He often talks about how being a human being is like winning the lotto. Here's another good one too.

And that there's no room to complain

(More good videos here, here, and here.)

Ok, kids are kids, and they will winge and whine and complain 'til the cows come home.

But, inside all of that, there's definitely a life lesson to be learned.

All I can do is speak for my kids and their situation.

They have no room to complain.

As soon as they start whining about some stupid thing, like how they wanted another biscuit and someone else had one more than they did, I give them 'the look', and I make them switch into 'what are you grateful for' mode.

STOP complaining. 

START declaring to yourself what you're grateful for in your day. 

How about listing 5 things you're grateful for each week?

It can be as simple as, "I slept well last night."

Or, "I ate one of my favourite meals."

Or, "I finished a great book."

Or, "I got laid."

Whatever.

Just be grateful for it.

Start small. Work up to big. 

One step at a time.

Watch what happens.

Have fun!

— Dr MaryAnne

PS - How about being grateful for getting adjusted and getting a great massage? Haven't done that in a while? Book those now!

I'll tell you a little secret.

Who am I kidding? Only myself.

There is no secret. Only real stuff here.

Last week I was stressed. I had 'overbooked' myself.

It wasn't the mildly stressed state where a tub of ice cream or a bottle of champagne could remedy the situation. It was the, OMG, how-am-I-going-to-survive-these-next-few-days-and-can-I-lock-myself-in-a-spa-for-a-month-and-disappear kind of stress. 

Going to the gym is my catharsis. I've been improving my strength, I'm lifting more weights, and I'm getting in better shape. I love seeing how I grow and I love what training does for me. It's my escape.

(And to keep my body and mind going to help all that work together, I of course get adjusted regularly.)

But last week I had to cut my workouts short. I was only able to go to the gym twice, instead of four times. I had a seminar to go to. All the way out in Derbyshire. First time there. I was thinking, WTH is Derby? (Lovely place. Love the accents. Gorgeous rolling hills.)

I had to go to this seminar because I want to be skilled and competent in newborn tongue-tie diagnosis. (Excellent seminar. Definitely worth it. Now I'm confident that I can do that.)

That was Wednesday to Friday. Got home late Friday night. Totally knackered. Saturday morning had a full house of adjusting people. (That actually brings me good energy because I love adjusting. I get in the zone.) Finally, I got home, and gathered up my kids and the camping gear, and set out to somewhere near Southhampton, waaaaay out in the boonies. 

My husband looked at me like I was crazy. He says to me, "There's 2 problems. 1. You are knackered and you don't want to go. 2. You promised Soph and you have to go." (My husband was never going camping in the first place, so the whole adventure was on me. Oh, and at the last minute, Max decided he wanted to stay home with his daddy.)

(SIGH. I kept praying for rain because I told Sophia when I booked the camping trip that if it rained, we weren't going. Yeah, forecast had no rain in sight.)

I came this close to throwing in the towel and giving up.

But, I realised what I had done, sucked it up, pulled myself together, and made the best of it. We jumped into the car and off we went. And we got there. I begged three of the male friends to help me put up my tent because by that time I was pretty much brain dead. I needed to borrow their male brains and male muscles.

(Thanks guys! You saved me!)

Tent went up easy-peasy. The girls were absolutely drunk with excitement. I plopped down on a lawn chair. And people were offering me some Prosecco.

Not bad!

Gradually I started realising that I was actually really happy that we made it to the boonies for this camping trip. I felt really good. My stressful week was turning out A-OK! In fact, I loved being away from the city, breathing in the clean air, hanging around friends, and enjoying the moment. 

There was a lesson in this, for sure. I need to take on fewer responsibilities. I didn't HAVE to make all these promises. I didn't HAVE to pretend I was Super Woman. I didn't HAVE to do anything I didn't want to. And it was important for me to be totally OK with that.

When we got home on Sunday, I was so damn relieved I survived the week. And I was especially very aware of the fact that I stayed on course, kept my promises, and still made the most of it. I came out strong.

I had to learn the hard way though. I think my husband would tell me I'm stubborn. He's probably right.

(I choose to say another word: I'm unstoppable.)

But I also have to learn how to slooooow dooooown.

And get adjusted!